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Author Topic: Finally got rid of my Cyano  (Read 2272 times)

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Offline Kyleb100

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Finally got rid of my Cyano
« on: November 13, 2010, 02:58:27 pm »
After trying everything non-medicinal I could possibly try I finally resorted to dosing.  I ended up going to Aqua Tropics and talking to the owner there and he sold me on a product called RedCyano by Blue Vet RX.  It comes in a small vial in powder form and treats up to 400 gallons according to the package(optimistic).  The day after I dosed, the Cyano turned from red to green, on the 3rd day it appears to be completely dead and grayish in color.  My sand is the whitest I have seen it in months.  I'll try to keep ya'll updated with my results.

Now I can finally started stocking my tank as long as my parameters stay in check, it's been an extremely difficult 8 month initial cycle.

Offline Ed

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Re: Finally got rid of my Cyano
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2010, 11:56:21 am »
I do not know very much about red slime removers.   I do know that some contain Oxydizers.  Those oxydizers can affect the Ph.    I know people that have used these products are usually doing a water change two days later.    I need to do some more reading on this.   If you have a fish only or reef.   Ph and alkalinity are very important.  Changing water hardness too fast can be detrimentall of aquarium inhabitants.   Your product may not even affect the PH at all.    But sometimes medications do.   That is always a concern for me. 
come over and see..:)

Offline Kyleb100

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Re: Finally got rid of my Cyano
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2010, 07:36:44 pm »
Haven't checked my PH since I dosed, but I did do a 25% water change a few days afterward.  Right now my tank is FOWLR so it wasn't a big concern for me at this point.  On a positive note, I did check my phosphate again the other day and they are down to 0.  I believe it's due to switching out my RO holding tanks to a higher quality tank and the addition of my TLF phosban reactor a few weeks ago.

Offline tropicalqualities

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Re: Finally got rid of my Cyano
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2010, 01:09:07 am »
OK this is in my ball park ;D the blue life and a couple other products work excellent as a treatment but after two days of the treatment you need to do a 30% water change this is required if you do not your tank will be way out of wack and remember it is a poison it is not anything that will effect your tank short term but long term it can cause a total loss --- jost like some meds that we get as humans they get read of are cold but if you took it every day it would kill you
When on the road to sweet Athy, Hurroo Hurroo When on the road to sweet Athy A stick in the hand, A drop in the eye A doleful damsel I heard cry , Johnny I hardly knew ya

Offline Kyleb100

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Re: Finally got rid of my Cyano
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2010, 06:01:56 pm »
I did a water change a few days afterward and only did the 1 treatment.  Everything seems to be doing great at the moment.  I will remember that though in case of future instances

Offline Ed

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Re: Finally got rid of my Cyano
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2010, 08:30:46 pm »
Ok, Steve Bicker in Cali gave me this little write up about Bio Pellets.

The Bio-Pellet Revolution - The Real Deal in Biological Filtration

The bane of all reef aquarium owners and service professionals has always been keeping the two most dreaded sights from appearing in the aquarium: Hair or nuisance Algae and Cyanobacteria (red slime). The appearance of these pests are a symptom of high levels of two compounds: Nitrate and Phosphate. Nitrates and Phosphates are unavoidable as they are necessary for life. These two compounds are in the food and are by-products of biological processes such as fish waste and other detritus from the myriad living creatures in a reef aquarium.

Why do Nitrates and Phosphates accumulate?
The simple answer to this question is that Nitrate and Phosphate accumulate because they are only 2/3rds of the chemical components needed for the magic of microfaunal reproduction to occur. Without the third component, biological reproduction of microfauna is not possible. What is the mystery 3rd component needed and why do we care about microfauna reproducing? In short, Carbon is the 3rd component and when Carbon is available in the right form and sufficient quantity, the microfauna (OK, bacteria) begin to reproduce. FAST. REALLY FAST. As they reproduce, they metabolize the excess Nitrate and Phosphorus and incorporate these molecules into their cell structures. Like magic, Nitrate and Phosphate levels plummet. To be clear, the Nitrate and Phosphate are still in the aquarium but they are now incorporated into the physical bodies of bateria and thus unavailable as food for Algae and Cyanobacteria.


come over and see..:)
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