Author Topic: PO4x4 media  (Read 2897 times)

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Offline Ed

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PO4x4 media
« on: May 08, 2011, 09:22:52 AM »
This  new media is rumored to removed 4 times the amount of phosphates compared to Iron Based GFO.

reactor with PO4X4 phosphate remover
come over and see..:)

Offline Ed

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2011, 09:26:58 AM »

PO4x4 Phosphate Remover






My nitrate and phosphate levels are close to zero, but algae is growing ! Sounds familiar ?

Maintaining the levels of waste products low while feeding your animals on a regular basis is essential for keeping invertebrates and fish in good health. In microbial well balanced aquaria, the two major pollutants are nitrates and phosphates. With current use of NP-Reducing BioPellets, it has become very easy to maintain nitrates and phosphate levels close to zero, however, in most tanks there is still a surplus of phosphates. Phosphate levels exceeding 0.03 ppm will negatively affect coral growth and higher levels will also negatively influence the health of your fish. In addition, high phosphate levels enhance the growth of annoying algae and cyanobacteria. Most of current phosphate reducing products are based on granular ferric hydroxide and leak iron-ions into your tank, which is enhancing algae growth and inhibiting coral growth and have a tendency to start clumping together, thus reducing its effectiveness.

Almost every other iron based GFO is releasing iron-ions to the water up to 10 times more than natural seawater levels. This is tested and confirmed at the university of Wageningen, Holland. The tests were done with a inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

Our novel PO4X4 Phosphate Remover is a unique chemical engineered polymer based mini pellets that does not have these down sides. In other words, there is hardly any leaking of Iron-ions, the pellets do not clump together and can be readily used in fluidized filters. They have a very high surface area and can absorb approximately 4 times more phosphate then most other phosphate removing products. 250 ml will remove 3 ppm of phosphate and silicate from roughly 8.000 liter of fresh water or 4.000 liter of marine water. Do not overdose! Rapid changes in phosphate can negatively affect your animals. Use small amounts of PO4X4 to gradually lower the phosphate levels in your aquarium.

PO4X4 is now availeble in 250ml and 500ml. PO4X4 works in perfect harmony with our NP Reducing BioPellets and ReefPearls.
 
come over and see..:)

Offline Nate R

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2011, 08:55:50 PM »
I read about this stuff on RB. I am interested in this for sure and will prob be trying this when i run out of my current p04 remover. I use Phosgaurd from seachem but i m sure you have read the articles about it possibly leaching aluminum back in to the water but I ve never been a fan of the GFO because of mess it make preparing it for running it in a reactor. Personally i dont know if i have any negative effects from the phosgaurd other than i feel it exhausts within 30 to 40 days max
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Offline Ed

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2011, 02:20:27 PM »
a side affect of some phosphate removers is Alk going out of whack. 
GFO has not been a issue for me as of yet.  But I usually introduce things slowly. 
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Offline Nate C.

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2011, 10:02:37 AM »
a side affect of some phosphate removers is Alk going out of whack. 
GFO has not been a issue for me as of yet.  But I usually introduce things slowly. 

Out of whack how?  Been running GFO for about 6-8 months now and alk has been a bit low, but Ca was being over-dosed (running doser far too long per day for a while) and I wasn't doing testing too frequently.  I've got things adjusted where levels for Alk are climbing again and Ca has stabilized for the most part in the range I want as well.

Offline Ed

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2011, 11:27:19 AM »
That was one of the issues I was warned about was introduction of GFO or othere Phosphate removers being added too fast can sometimes affect Alk.   I will pm you who told me that.  lol. :)
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Offline Ed

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Re: PO4x4 media
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2011, 09:55:10 AM »
Further update after talking to Boomer on Reef Frontiers with Help from his friend Randy Holmes Farley.

Here is his reply.



Hi Ed, sorry I'm late but have been busy lately with lots of stuff going on.

There is a talk of GFO putting iron back into reef tank. Therefore promoting algae growth. Is there any way to learn if that is fact or fiction?

No, it is no fiction but fact but should not be an issue, as most reef tanks are more depleted of iron than any other ion and need iron. Many reefers dose iron.

This so called new GFO is not new. PolyLabs use to make on called Opti-Phos.

These are just GFO with a poly coating. The have shown no proof that it does not leach iron out, it is just a claim. All I see is marketing hype. It may be more on the order as Randy suggested the other day that it is likely to break apart less, thus exposing less free GFO which *may leach iron which normal GFO * may do. Humm, how come when people test their tanks for iron using GFO they do not see all this iron ???
come over and see..:)